Old millenials will be annoying

Old millenials will be annoying

I got lost reading some old messages today.

So much of our life is being documented in the digital age we are in. The nature of big tech keeping all our data permanently means—setting aside the privacy concerns for a bit—that there will be (already is) so much of our stuff online for us to pause, look back at and reflect upon; to relive our happiness and sadness, to replay our embarrassing moments over and over again, to remind ourselves what made us angry, what made us feel loved, etc.

For the longest time, I thought not posting anything online ever was one way of not leaving a trail of your entire life behind you. But that changed when I started this blog. And even if you are not publishing content in public, you still are in private—in your emails and messages/texts.

For us millenials, when we are older, the wonderment of nostalgia will always be interrupted by the mundanity of a back-up. As more and more people get access to internet and come online, the early adopters will wax lyrical about their days of yore.

“Here’s the text from 2016 when I told your grandmother, that she was a national hero for posting a photo without make-up. She even made it to Buzzfeed.”

“Here is the YouTube video where grandpa and I read the last messages from our exes simultaneously and then cried with our backs to each other. So moving.”

“Umm... here. My first tweet. And mind you, my first name was my username. Crazy right?”

“I was the first to get on Instagram amongst all my friends. Look, it says 2012. Can you see?”

Old millenials will be fucking annoying… with proof.